Tuesday, August 14, 2012

TEA QUOTES FOR TEA TIME TUESDAY AND OTHER TRIVIA



When tea first arrived in England, it was called by its Cantonese slang term - cha.  Later the British began to call it by the local word t'e, or Tay or Tee.


From "365 Things Every Tea Lover Should Know"

NOW CAN ANYONE EXPLAIN THIS TO ME?




This painting by Anthony Van Dyke of King Charles I is in Buckingham Palace - shown in the movie "The Queen's Palaces".
It is also shown in Downtown Abbey Series in the Dining Room behind where Robert sits at the head of the table.  

HOW CAN THIS BE?  DOES ANYONE KNOW THIS?

Another Tea Quote from 
"365 Things Every Tea Lover Should Know":

"Tea for Two," a song published in 1924 with lyrics by Irving Caesar, was from the musical comedy NO NO NANETTE, which opened in Detroit in April, 1924. It is one of the most familiar melodies in the world.

I am linking this post to Tea Time Tuesday

6 comments:

Antiques And Teacups said...

Hi Bernideen. That isn't the picture I was thinking of...so I can't help you! Let us know when you find out....
Ruth

[email protected] Rose Chintz Cottage said...

An interesting post, Bernideen. I have heard the song many times but have no idea about the painting. Curious! Thank you for joining me for tea and have a lovely day.

Blessings,
Sandi

Johanna said...

Hi Bernideen,
I don't know why the painting hang in two different places. May be there exist two similar paintings? Or they used it just for the movie stage. Anyway, it looks really Royal. And the tea quotes are as always very interesting.
Best greetings, Johanna

Lavender Cottage said...

I guess with our British heritage, it is why we often call it 'tay' - comes from hubby's grandmother I believe.
Perhaps the painting is a duplicate to help authenticate Downton Abbey?
My dad used to always sing tea for two, among other songs. Unfortunately, he never knew all the words to ANY song. :-)
Judith

Julie and Becky said...

Hi - I can think of three different reasons, but I'll start with the most likely: the one shown on Downton Abbey is a copy made for the production.

2: Van Dyck made several paintings in a series - this could be an earlier version of it and the owners of the grand house could actually own the lesser painting.

3: The Royal Collection is available for lending to other institutions for exhibition and could also possibly be available for rent. I would think the insurance on something like that would be prohibitive, though.

Michele @ The Nest at Finch Rest said...

Neat post, very interesting.