Wednesday, July 11, 2012

EARLY MORNING TEA IN THE GARDEN OF QUEEN ANNE'S LACE


What a beautiful morning for Tea In The Garden.........



Some of you know that two years ago I threw Queen Anne's Lace Seeds in every direction in my garden.  These seeds were from Columbia, Missouri and yes I know it is truly a weed - but just the same I LOVE Queen Anne's Lace.













I hope you enjoy your visit here to my small backyard
 Beatrix Potter Tea Garden - help yourself to tea.....


Mr. Peter Rabbit was also boasting about his Foxglove....








Some of the plants are over 4 feet high 
stretching upward to the sun:











Queen Anne's Lace lives for 2 years after seeding.  The first year it comes up as a tiny dull,lighter than parsley color and remains small.  The second year, it shoots up and sends a "fury" stalk which blooms and makes thousands of new seeds.  The key to having it all the time is to put seeds out again.  When you get too much - just thin.  I find I can transplant smaller plants it if it is done quickly and watered a lot and about 80% survive the move.







I have loved old china for a very long time and the Homer and Laughlin (America) Magnolia Dishes were given to me back in the 1980's by Suzie Butler in Burlington, Iowa ........











 I do hope you will join friends below and visit their special "Tea In the Garden" and if you have posted one yourself please link below as well!  Please have a link back to this post AS WELL!



18 comments:

Deanna said...

Dear Bernideen, As I read that your seeds are from Columbus, Missouri,
I had to laugh out loud as we drove through Columbus, Missouri this past week-end and stopped to take some pictures of the Queen's Lace blooming in a field. They are such a unique blossom and I can't bare to think they are a weed. However, the Kansas State flower is the Sunflower and considered to be a weed by some. Kind of like one man's trash is another man's treasure. Grins.
Lovely pictures and may you have a wonderful rest of the Summer.
God bless,
d

Marilyn said...

I'd consider the Queen Anne's Lace to be a favorite! Some think my violets would be weeds, too. I think they actually help keep the weed seeds from sprouting because they are so thick. And heaven knows there are enough seeds blown in with all the wind we have on the eastern plains. Your garden looks gorgeous.♥♫

Kathy A Delightsome Life said...

Hello Bernideen - Queen Anne's Lace grows wild here too - I love its frothy flowers! Your garden is gorgeous and it is a lovely day for tea outdoors! I do appreciate you hostessing,
Kathy

lemonverbenalady said...

You may find The Herbal Husband digging some up one day, Bernideen! He was bemoaning the fact the other day that we didn't have any more in the garden. It is a good weed because it brings a lot of beneficial insects. xxoo Nancy

Johanna said...

Hi Bernideen,
Queen Ann Lace might be a weed because it spreads easily. But it is a charming plant and we say wild carrot to it. I love your Chintz tea pot and the Magnolia set is also pretty. What a talented gardener must be Mr. Fisher. He has such wonderful foxgloves.
Best greetings, Johanna

Bunny said...

I love Queen Ann's lace and it grows as a weed here. I actually dug up some and planted in my garden but it died.
Love your garden and teapot.

Lavender Cottage said...

Hello Bernideen
I grow a cultivar of Queen Anne's lace called Ami - it is the florist variety but I will scatter wildflower seeds as well.
Your birdbath is so cute and of course I love the bouquet of QAL.
Judith

Rosewalk Cottage said...

Hi Bernideen!
I love your pretty Chintz teapot and I'm going to try growing Queen Annes Lace from seeds. Thank you for the information.
~Clara

Two Cottages And Tea said...

Your outdoor tea is so beautiful. I look forward to seeing it every week. Love the teapot and your teacups. Your foxgloves look so fresh and perfect! Mine have been gone for quite a while. I do have Queen Anne's Lace in my flower beds and enjoy it too! Have a great rest of the week and thank you for hosting.
Nancy

Betty Stapleton said...

I love the Queens Anne Lace, I was telling my hubby yesterday that it is so pretty. I have a story I save that God looked down on the earth and all his beauty was gone, everything was green and no wildflowers, it is so good.
That tea pot is gorgeous too. Thank you for hosting tea in the garden...

janice15 said...

Your Homer and Laughlin Magnolia Dishes are very sweet...I love your Queen Anne's lace, they really don't look like weeds from your photos...love your posts always...have a great rest of the week...with love Janice

Ann said...

I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE your violet teapot!!! But not so much, the Queen Annes' Lace. It may be because it tends to take over my rock garden area in my front yard, and I've never sewn one single seed!!! :/ So, it really is like a weed here! Thanks for sharing and hosting your blog party!!

Ann @ Cairn Cottage
“Better joy in a cottage than sorrow in a palace” Spanish Proverb

Cristeen said...

fantastic post and Thanks for sharing this info. It's very helpful.
B&B in Jaipur

[email protected] Rose Chintz Cottage said...

Good morning Bernideen,
I love Queen Anne's Lace and it's just starting to come up everywhere here on the Island. Love your chintz teapot! Another lovely tea, thank you.

Blessings,
Sandi

parTea lady said...

The Queen Anne's lace looks lovely in your garden. The Homer and Laughlin china is beautiful.

Angela McRae said...

How charming! I love Queen Anne's Lace too. It's sort of like a doily in the form of a plant!

Cori G. said...

Hi Bernideen, I had no idea Queen Anne's Lace was a weed. I grew it once in my rose garden, but it attracted so many aphids that I had to remove it. It was such a sad day for me. I hope all is well in your corner of the world.
OH! I saw your coomeng about google going away...have you read that somewhere? I certainly hope it doesn't disappear!!
xoxo Cori

Beth said...

Love your china and teapot! I always enjoy seeing your garden as it is really lovely. Queen Anne's lace is really lovely. I grow something that looks quite similar but is a little less invasive for me. It's called ammi majus and I got the seeds from Judith of Lavender Cottage. I'd be happy to share seeds if you are interested.
Hugs, Beth